Ethno village Koritnjak

(Google translate) Koritnjak, which is also referred to as Koritnik and Koritar, is a desert village in the Municipality of Niska Banja in the area of ​​the city of Niš in Nisava District. According to the 2002 census, there were no residents (according to the 1991 census there were 8 inhabitants).

Koritnjak is located on the southern edge of the Niš valley, the composite part of the composite Nisavska valley and the slopes of the northwestern part of the same name (808 m), Suve Planine (1,810 m), at the northwestern foot of Black Stone (867 m), one of its peaks.

Ethno village Koritnjak

(Google translate) Koritnjak, which is also referred to as Koritnik and Koritar, is a desert village in the Municipality of Niska Banja in the area of ​​the city of Niš in Nisava District. According to the 2002 census, there were no residents (according to the 1991 census there were 8 inhabitants).

Koritnjak is located on the southern edge of the Niš valley, the composite part of the composite Nisavska valley and the slopes of the northwestern part of the same name (808 m), Suve Planine (1,810 m), at the northwestern foot of Black Stone (867 m), one of its peaks.
From the steep and upright bare sides of the Corinthians, due to the inability to always receive all the atmospheric deposits, during the summer rains and snow melting, floods of surface atmospheric water flowed, causing great damage to the surrounding settlements. One of the valleys flourished under the village of Koritnjak to the northwestern part of Niska Banja, and created a “corroded” gutter by which the village and the elevation (808 m high) were named.
Koritnjak is a village of compact physiognomy type, spatially developed in the altitude belt from 580 m to 620 m absolute height, an irregularly oval shape extending southwest-northeast. The village spatially connects two parts or “small”:
Upper Mali (eastern part of the village), which is composed of two groups of tribal families – Korubinci and Riđaci
The lower small (western part of the village), consisting of three groups of tribal families – Drdaci, Lazarovi and Nedeljkovi.
Koritnjak is located 4 km south of international communications;
Railways (Vienna-Budapest-Belgrade-Nis-Sofia-Istanbul)
Main road, branches V (Nis-Sofia-Istanbul) of the main corridor 10 (Salzburg-Ljubljana-Zagreb-Belgrade-Niš-Skopje-Veles-Thessaloniki). Koritnjak is by road from the municipality of Niška Banja 3.5 km, and Niš, 11 km.

The scarce material traces of the older inhabitants of Koritnjak and the small written data, which are not reliable enough and credible, are the main reasons why the genesis and evolution of the village in the past are not sufficiently known. Nevertheless, the available facts tell us that the history of the Corinthian has a multi-week continuity.
Koritnjak belongs to medieval settlements and in written sources is first mentioned in the Turkish cadastral list from 1564, entitled Koritar. In the 16th century (according to the same sources) the Koritar was predominantly inhabited by the inhabitants of Vlach and had 16 households and 11 unmarried ones.
There is no reliable data on the period of early Turkish rule. Before the liberation from the Turks (mid 19th century), one kilometer to the northwest of Koritnik was the legendary settlement “Kovanluk” (now the urban part of Niška Banja), and the Tatar settlement on the site “Greek meadow”.
Koritnjak with Radikin Bahr was a spahic pose of Yusuf-beg … the “master” of the land and people in the spahiluka area … who protected the Koritnik residents, and they did not participate in military campaigns because they had a duty to assist the state during the war The villagers remember that during the period of the Turkish occupation, “ten people” were collected in Koritnjak, and that besides the Serbs, there were also Turkish houses in the Gornje and Donje Kučište locality, which were evicted just before the liberation of Niš in 1877.

During the Ottoman rule, the Koritnaya population was mainly engaged in extensive cattle breeding, because during the time of the Turkish devastation, the cattle could quickly hide and hide, and was also important for the cultivation of the soil. Farming had a “quash” character and met its own needs of rural households. Since the Spahi agrarian regime was based on a patriarchal (blood) cooperative, at that time every tribe was a family cooperative. Cooperatives continued until the end of the Second World War, when they numbered up to 20 members.
After liberation from the Turks, livestock farming continued to be the most important branch of agriculture, and until the Second World War in Koritnjak, the residents of nearby villages (eg Koprivnica) came to “serve” as well as guarded the livestock.
The greater economic significance, in Koritnjak, had traditional lime production in Polish crabs. After the Second World War, about fifteen crevasses worked (at places Cicka, Rid, Rovina and in the village itself), whose capacity was up to 170 tons of lime in one turn. In 2004, when entering the village, only one limestone (capacity of three tons) was in operation. In addition to crocodiles, the traditional occupation of the locals was also the wood cutting of building and firewood.

Coordinates:

Latitude: 43.281233

Longitude: 22.008554